the colour of our lives

poetry • celebration • faith • nature • humanity • imperfections • glory

touch stones

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an instalment of proverbs, psalms and curses

marricrowdDo not ask a tree
how old it is. It
will never tell you,
and you will have
to cut it to the
ground to find out.
It may fall on you.

Do not cover the
soil with anything
that has not grown
in soil first. One day,
when you are no
longer alive, soil will
cover you.

You must never
taint or hoard
water. The risks are
too great; wars have
been waged over
less. While much is
still free, save and
purify all you can.

Be kind to all
things living; this
is your dominion,
the first gifts spoken. We
will know, like Job,
that these are
our teachers.

stonesDo not tear the
stones from their
resting places in the
Earth. At the very end,
as time and space
collapse, they will
shame you with
their singing.

.

o0OOOo

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14 thoughts on “touch stones

  1. BernieLuvsEllen on said:

    Trees are something else. I Like this poem.

  2. It was the last stanza that got to me, the rocks that shame us with their singing. You said this so well.
    Your poetry makes me want to write. It’s not a competitive thing. It is just so encouraging and enlightening to see the fruit of your vision that it makes me want to go back to the source of vision. Keep on seeing things and writing it down.

    • Thank you Carroll… this was another, I suppose, of the ‘bit on the preachy side’ variety. Most likely I preach to myself, primarily. I’m glad my writing inspires you, because you (and your talented daughter) write very well, from the same direction. Hope to see more on Caleb’s Eye soon; in the meantime I’ll try to read some more of the treasures already there.

  3. Who we are is expressed through how we treat others…even stones…

  4. Hi there Dan,

    Just absolutely had to stop back by and do some more reading after enjoying your many lovely comments on my own pieces. Thank you for taking the time to read them – it is always wonderful to know that someone out in cyberspace is reading what I’m putting out there!

    I actually crossed over this poem on the tag page when you posted it, so it was funny to me when I clicked back over here to see that this too was yours. While it will be difficult for you to top how much I love the blues piece, this one is also quite enjoyable – especially the first stanza. Very nice work!

    I agree with your comment that we write similar pieces. I themed a piece on a comparison of a suffering friend to the wails of a “fretful guitar” – so that is actually what caught my attention on your page this morning. I will look forward to continuing to read more from you!

    Jessica

  5. Well, thank you again… I must try and bring more music into my poetry, there’s an obvious synergy and I think I read & enjoyed your fretful guitar piece.
    I agree the first stanza of ‘touch stones’ is the strongest; this was the original idea, after I cycled past a whole street full of felled trees where a hospital car park was being remodelled.

  6. I was so surprised to read that you thought this a ‘bit on the preachy side’. I think it is restrained and deeply thought-provoking – not preachy at all. The imagery is just lovely. I sometimes take home particularly interesting pebbles whenever I get the chance to walk along a beach. I don’t think I’ll do that anymore – those are probably the very pebbles that should stay exactly where they are!

    I thought I had subscribed to your blog ages ago; it seems not to have worked. I’ve done so again and will keep my fingers crossed that it worked this time!

    • Wow, thank you for reading and commenting so thoughtfully – and for going through the ‘back catalogue’. As far as being preachy goes, I suppose I have a personal reaction to imperatives of any kind
      We have plenty of stones and rocks in our family collection; they decorate our garden, our house, my office… I hope I’m right in thinking that something that is treasured as being beautiful, or symbolic of goodness of some kind, won’t be a source of shame.
      Any subscriptions I’m lucky enough to get are absolute privilege and gift! 🙂

    • P.S. I think there are 2 level of subscription on WordPress; one you can access when logged in, and one where you also get emails for new posts. Not exactly sure though, nor how to set one of the other up…

      • Oh, thank you! I don’t feel so bad now about my pebbles and shells!

        I’m not sure what I did wrong last time re. the subscription, but I now have a confirmation that I am subscribed by email, so all should be well now! I look forward to reading more.

  7. This is a lovely reminder that humans are not the lords of this world. We should show Mother Nature the respect she deserves. Great poem!

  8. *Bows* brother! Your penchant for Nature, the cosmos, deep thinking, poetry and art…. This is so like mine. I never thought I could find someone alive who shares such beauty with such purity! This is lovely! I’m so glad that on my very first day here I tumbled down the mountain of blogs and right on the threshold of your Realm! Wow… i feel blessed! (:

  9. awesome and thoughtful and thought-provoking. i love the last stanza, especially. and i love the title or subtitle…”installment of proverbs, psalms, and curses,” especially the “curses” part (smile).

    • another recent comment of yours I’m grateful for – thanks for your continued support. Curses, yeah, part of the balanced and authentic human experience; without acknowledging them we lack integrity, while hoping for a day that makes the curses irrelevant.

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